Eukaryotic Cell

Thursday, January 29, 2009

An Eurkaryotic cell is a cell whose cytoplasm is bound by a plasma membrane and contains a nucleus. In its membrane-bound compartments specific metabolic activities take place. Most important among these compartments is the nucleus, which houses the eukaryotic cell’s DNA. It is this nucleus that gives the eukaryote its name, which literally means "true nucleus." Many eukaryotic cells contain other membrane-bound organelles such as mitochondria, chloroplasts and Golgi apparatus.

Eukaryotic cells are typically 10 to 100 micrometers across, or about 10 times the size of prokaryotic cells. Cell division in eukaryotes is different from organisms without a nucleus (prokaryotes). It involves separating the duplicated chromosomes, through movements directed by microtubules. There are two types of division processes.

Eukaryotic cells are typically much larger than prokaryotes. They have a variety of internal membranes and structures, called organelles, and a cytoskeleton composed of microtubules, microfilaments, and intermediate filaments, which play an important role in defining the cell's organization and shape. Eukaryotic DNA is divided into several linear bundles called chromosomes, which are separated by a microtubular spindle during nuclear division.